Great Powers are Criminally Negligent or Grossly Stupid: Sanctions to Incite Crime and Division in Rhodesia 1967

The more contented and happy the inhabitants of any country, the lower the crime rate will be and Rhodesia was an excellent example of this state of affairs, said Mr. Cliff Dupont in his address at the opening of the Trade Fair in Bulawayo. Incidentally, Rhodesia has a lower proportion of police to population that there is in Britain.

The Hon. Clifford Walter Dupont, G.C.L.M., I.D, First President of Rhodesia, 1970-1975.

Rhodesian Commentary, 22nd May 1967 via Colin Weyer, Window on Rhodesia

According to conservative estimates well over a million people have died by violence in Africa north of the Zambezi [river] in this decade alone, and I fear the slaughter is not yet ended.

This takes no account of the numberless thousands, possibly millions, who have died of starvation and disease.

Most of Africa today is sick – sick of a contagious disease caused by the germ of responsibilities prematurely granted or assumed and spread by the *winds of change.

[*A reference to British Prime Minister Harold MacMillan’s ‘decolonisation’ speech in South Africa, February 3, 1960. It virtue-signaled the expansion of the Communist Bloc into Africa in accordance with the objectives of the third and fourth Comintern (Communist International) objectives.]
The Zambezi River runs across the top of Rhodesia.

This disease, by putting political expediency before national well-being, saps the strength and stability of a nation and corrupts its moral standards.

This germ is known as ‘immature majority rule’ and it is with this germ that Britain now seeks to infect Rhodesia.

It was quite obvious that the British Government and and its allies in the sanctions war are in no way concerned about Rhodesia or Rhodesians, black or white, despite their hypocritical assertions to the contrary, said Mr. Dupont.

Sanctions, if they bite, as our enemies hope must first affect the African. In fact one could surmise that the object of sanctions is to upset the harmony that has existed in this country between African and European that has existed in this country since the turn of the century, and never so more than today.

The battle against poverty, ignorance and disease was forgotten in the struggle for national and even personal aggrandisement except in our part of the world.

Surely the leaders of the responsible great powers were guilty of criminal negligence or else gross stupidity when they ignore all this in favour of crushing a small peaceful country such as Rhodesia to salve the ‘wounded’ pride* of the British government.

[*There was outrage in the British establishment over Rhodesia being the second in 200 years, after the U.S.A., to declare unilateral independence.]

In this country, said Mr. Dupont, we are fighting the battle of ignorance to the best of our ability with our educational programme.

We are fighting disease very successfully with our health services and we are fighting poverty by developing our resources – agricultural, mineral and industrial.

This country can be and will be a great food-exporter as it is developed. But instead of encouraging the development of food production, a world-wide need, certain governments would destroy our agriculture if they could, by sanctions. How stupid, but alas, how wicked.

Despite the efforts of our enemies we shall continue to win the battle against poverty, ignorance and disease in this fair country of ours.

Editor’s Comment:

The desired impact of sanctions was to contract the economy and break the nation. The first people to be harmed would be employees as businesses cut back production and those benefiting the most from government programs – in other words the black Rhodesian population.

It must be remembered that Rhodesia never needed or took aid from Britain like real colonies. Nor did Rhodesia grow through national debt. Extremely self-sufficient, the fledgling nation fast become a world leader in various industries and fields including community development. Here are a few examples:

Farm workers were provided housing and many farms created small villages for their workers families as their farms became profitable.

Domboshawa Training Centre

Located north of Salisbury in the Chinamora Tribal Trust Land opened in 1964 and was “the national training centre for community development in Rhodesia.  The country’s policy of community development has been one of its finest products.  In line with international thinking in this field – this is a process for combining the efforts of people with those of government for the social, economic and cultural advancement of the nation.  The policy of community development applies to all communities in Rhodesia.  It is not a substitute for national development, but a means to supplement it, using hitherto untapped local resources.”

Domboshawa Training Centre
Domboshawa Training Centre

Bulawayo Municipality’s Mzilikazi Township

An aerial view of part of Bulawayo Municipality’s Mzilikazi Township shows:
A – Mpilo African Hospital, the second-largest in Rhodesia;
B – White City Stadium, a well-equipped centre for African sport in Matabeleland;
C – Mzilikazi School for township children.

COUNTRIES alive to the social consequences of slums have adopted various policies to prevent or eliminate them.

Rhodesia has her own system.  Here, municipalities are the main housing authorities for Africans.  Housing is financed by loans from central government and from the profits of the municipal liquor undertakings, and employers, through a levy, provide a subsidy.

As Bulawayo has shown, this policy has been remarkably successful.

The city’s population of nearly a quarter of a million is about 20 per cent European, 2 per cent Asian and Coloured, and the remainder African. This last group has the greatest need for housing, as its vast majority are new to urban life, and to the demands, costs and complexities of urban living, and above all, because, as a whole, it is the less skilled section of Rhodesian society.

The £20 000 Mapendere Building (above), completely African owned and financed, is an example of the degree of businessmen’s participation in investment in the townships. (Prices shown are as at 1968.)

Encouragement has also been given to people to put their roots down and feel Bulawayo is their home. The first home-ownership in the country was pioneered here. So cautious were the authorities at the time that the original one was for a 10 year lease only – this has been followed by leases for 30 years, and then for 99 years, and, finally, freehold tenure.

Over 6 000 houses, more than a third of the total, are now privately owned. Most of them were built by the Council, but all the larger ones were privately built, some of them costing some thousands of pounds.

Thirty-eight houses belong to the Mhlahlandlela Housing Co-operative, financed by the Rowntree Memorial Trust. This is of particular interest, as it is probably the only housing co-operative in Africa. It provides valuable experience in housing and estate management, and an opportunity for self-determination and self-expression.

Types of accommodation in the townships vary from:

The Rhodesian government developed and funded rural administration, training and infrastructure development programs to progressively shift black Rhodesians from subsistence farming to commercial farming. Their products would also be harmed by the sanctions, just as many were realizing the benefits of adopting the new and completely alien farming methods.

Sadly, the ‘liberation’ (as predicted) turned a bread-basket nation into a basket-case nation now perpetually on the brink of mass starvation.

Liberated Zimbabwe – A Bottomless Pit

For decades tax payers from many nations have sent billions in “aid” to prop up Maoist ZANU-PF dictatorship.

Share, re-blog and print options:

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll Up